Kuiper Belt Nasa

Kuiper Belt Nasa nasa  first encounter with pluto on the horizon Kuiper Nasa Belt

Kuiper Belt Nasa nasa first encounter with pluto on the horizon Kuiper Nasa Belt.

The Kuiper belt (/ˈkaɪpər, ˈkʊɪ-/), occasionally called the Edgeworth–Kuiper belt, is a circumstellar disc in the outer Solar System, extending from the orbit of Neptune (at 30 AU) to approximately 50 AU from the Sun. It is similar to the asteroid belt, but is far larger—20 times as wide and 20 to 200 times as massive. Like the asteroid belt, it consists mainly of small bodies or remnants from when the Solar System formed. While many asteroids are composed primarily of rock and metal, most Kuiper belt objects are composed largely of frozen volatiles (termed “ices”), such as methane, ammonia and water. The Kuiper belt is home to three officially recognized dwarf planets: Pluto, Haumea and Makemake. Some of the Solar System’s moons, such as Neptune’s Triton and Saturn’s Phoebe, may have originated in the region.

Black Hole in Siberia 2019

Black Hole in Siberia 2019 first ever image of black hole released in astrophysics in Siberia 2019 Black Hole

Black Hole in Siberia 2019 first ever image of black hole released in astrophysics in Siberia 2019 Black Hole.

A black hole is a region of spacetime exhibiting gravitational acceleration so strong that nothing—no particles or even electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event horizon. Although the event horizon has an enormous effect on the fate and circumstances of an object crossing it, no locally detectable features appear to be observed. In many ways, a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

What Does The Space Station Look Like From Earth

What Does The Space Station Look Like From Earth what does earth look like from the space station Earth Like Look What From The Space Station Does

What Does The Space Station Look Like From Earth what does earth look like from the space station Earth Like Look What From The Space Station Does.