Our Solar System Planets In Order From The Sun solar system Planets System In From Our The Order Solar Sun

Our Solar System Planets In Order From The Sun solar system Planets System In From Our The Order Solar Sun

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So, the next time you're planning a big fishing trip, make sure you know when the moon sets and rises for that day and plan around it. You will find your fishing experience a much more rewarding one for having that bit of knowledge. I promise!



A billion years ago, our Moon was closer to Earth than it is now. As a result, it appeared to be a much larger object in the sky. During that ancient era, if human beings had been around to witness such a sight, it would have been possible to see the entire Moon--not merely the one near side face that we see now. A billion years ago, it took our Moon only twenty days to orbit our planet, and Earth's own day was considerably shorter--only eighteen hours long. Stupendous, almost unimaginably enormous tides, that were more than a kilometer in height, would ebb and flow every few hours. However, things changed, as the lunar orbit around our primordial planet grew ever wider and wider. Annually, Earth's Moon moves about 1.6 inches farther out into space. Currently, the lunar rate of rotation, as well as the time it takes to circle our planet, are the same.



However, the models become somewhat more complicated when different forms of ice are taken into consideration. The ice floating around in a glass of water is termed Ice I. Ice I is the least dense form of ice, and it is lighter than water. However, at high pressures, like those that exist in crushingly deep subsurface oceans like Ganymede's, the ice crystal structures evolve into something considerably more compact. "It's like finding a better arrangement of shoes in your luggage--the ice molecules become packed together more tightly," Dr. Vance said in his May 1, 2014 statement. Indeed, the ice can become so extremely dense that it is actually heavier than water--and therefore somersaults down to the bottom of the sea. The heaviest, densiest ice of all is believed to exist within Ganymede, and it is called Ice VI.