Orion Astronaut tests ensure astronaut ground crew safety before orion Orion Astronaut

Orion Astronaut tests ensure astronaut ground crew safety before orion Orion Astronaut

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Titan is certainly an exotic, fascinating, frigid oddball, that bears an eerie resemblance to the primordial Earth before life emerged and evolved on our planet (prebiotic). In fact, Titan is the only moon in our entire Solar System with a substantial atmosphere. It is also the only known world--other than Earth--where stable bodies of surface liquid exist.



The paper from planetary scientists with the Cassini mission, published in the journal Science, suggests hydrogen gas, which could potentially provide a chemical energy source for living tidbits, is gushing into the subsurface global ocean of Enceladus from hydrothermal vents on the seafloor of this distant ice-world.



The most widely accepted scenario, explaining our Moon's mysterious and ancient birth, is termed the Giant Impact Theory. According to this theory, Earth's Moon was born as the result of a gigantic collision between our still-forming planet and a primordial Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. The tragedy that was the doomed Theia probably had an orbit that crossed Earth's--making such a catastrophic collision difficult to avoid. It is thought that the impacting Theia hit our planet hard, but swiped it with a glancing blow at precisely the right angle. In fact, Theia came very close to bouncing off Earth, but was swallowed instead. The blast dispatched shock waves across our ancient planet, hurling debris and gas screaming into space. For a short time, Earth had a ring around it that was composed of this ejected material.