NASA Space Shuttle Sketch space shuttles in sci fi Space NASA Sketch Shuttle

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The tiny moon--which for now has been designated S/2015 (136472) 1, and playfully nicknamed MK 2, for short--is more than 1,300 times dimmer than Makemake itself. MK 2 was first spotted when it was about 13,000 miles from its dwarf planet parent, and its diameter is estimated to be about 100 miles across. Makemake is 870 miles wide, and the dwarf planet, which was discovered over a decade ago, is named for the creation deity of the Rapa Nui people of Easter Island.



This gigantic "King of Planets" is considered by some astronomers to be a "failed star". It is about as large as a gas giant planet can be, and still be a planet. It is composed of approximately 90% hydrogen and 10% helium, with small amounts of water, methane, ammonia, and rocky grains mixed into the brew. If any more material were added on to this immense planet, gravity would hug it tightly--while its entire radius would barely increase. A baby star can grow to be much larger than Jupiter. However, a true star harbors its own sparkling internal source of heat--and Jupiter would have to grow at least 80 times more massive for its furnace to catch fire.



Most of the moons of our Solar System are intriguing, frigid, and dimly lit ice-worlds in orbit around the quartet of outer, majestic, gaseous giant planets that circle our Star, the Sun, from a great distance. In our quest for the Holy Grail of discovering life beyond our Earth, some of these icy moons are considered to be the most likely worlds, within our own Solar System, to host life. This is because they are thought to hide oceans of life-sustaining liquid water beneath their alien shells of ice--and life as we know it requires liquid water to emerge, evolve, and flourish. In April 2017, a team of planetary scientists announced that they have discovered the presence of hydrogen gas in a plume of material erupting from Enceladus, a mid-sized moon of the ringed, gas-giant planet Saturn, indicating that microbes may exist within the global ocean swirling beneath the cracked icy shell of this distant small world. Currently, two veteran NASA missions are providing new and intriguing details about the icy, ocean-bearing moons of the gas-giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, further heightening scientific fascination with these and other "ocean worlds" in our Solar System--and beyond.